Client

Pacific Autism Family Centre

Scope of Work

Design Research
Communication Strategy
Brand Identity & Naming

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Building on Informed Experiences

Educe partnered with PAFC to research and establish communication strategies that would engage families affected by autism and inform them of the precision medicine initiative targeted at improving diagnosis and treatment of autism.

The Pacific Autism Family Centre in partnership with the Personalized Medicine Initiative commissioned Educe Design to develop a visual identity system and communication strategy for their research initiative formerly known as iTARGET. The initiative aims to sub-cluster groups along the Autism Spectrum, and to create a collaborative network of specialists to provide better and more individualized therapies for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We developed a title for the project and a comprehensive, modular identity system that can be used versatilely within the current framework of the initiative, and can remain suitable as the project evolves.

The new title of the project, “Inform Every Autism” speaks to the academic research that is uncovering and linking underlying causes, and to treatments for autism with an interdisciplinary and big data approach. “Every” works on many levels — it implies the individualization and uniqueness of people living with ASD, uses a non-linear interpretation of the spectrum, and alludes to the collaboration of specialists, researchers, scientists and clinicians that are involved in the initiative. The visual identity works in tandem with this concept, representing the “many autisms” as parts to a greater whole; the big picture being held together by the many small parts.




We began the project with a design research workshop aimed at understanding the verbal, written and visual language surrounding the ASD community.

When the PAFC approached Educe for a website, identity and communications materials, we knew that it would be imperative for us to speak about Autism in a way that is appropriate, meaningful, representative and authentic. Starting off with a design research workshop, we aimed to get an honest understanding of the verbal, written and visual language that would resonate with the ASD community.

By incorporating research exercises into the early stages of the design process, it lets  us “poke holes” at our initial ideas and assumptions allows new thinking to emerge and a depart from existing patterns and ways of thinking. Most importantly, it helps us build a first hand understanding of the people that we are designing for. The goal of a design research workshop is not accuracy or right answers, but to create a space to diverge, digress and make mistakes—so that assumptions and misconceptions can be challenged and uncovered. With this in mind, we designed research activities that were focused on revealing the emotional motivations, barriers, frustrations, hopes, and concerns of participants with first-hand knowledge of life with and around Autism.






We had workshop participants engage in activities with evocative materials to gain a better understanding of their emotional motivations, barriers, frustrations, hopes and concerns.

We learned that a great amount of the current language surrounding ASD is problematic for many people in this community. We gathered first-hand stories, insights, challenges and opportunities, and through these observations it became clear that our design solutions would need to be dynamic, positive, empowering, reflect individualization as well as connective data.

The name Inform Every Autism is inclusive and expansive, and speaks to the science research that is uncovering and linking underlying causes, and to treatments for autism with an interdisciplinary and big data approach. “Every” works on many levels: it implies the individualization and uniqueness of people living with ASD, uses a non-linear interpretation of the spectrum, and alludes to the collaboration of the transdisciplinary specialists, researchers, scientists and clinicians involved in the initiative. The visual identity works in tandem with this concept, representing the “many autisms” as parts to a greater whole; the big picture being held together by the many small parts. Every Autism reflects commitment and breadth of vision, community and collaboration, and a whole-picture perspective to research.






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